Field Trip on Estero Bay, Part 1

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Snook Bight Marina on Fort Myers BeachOn June 18th 2011, my Coastal Systems Module class in the Florida Master Naturalist program embarked upon their second field trip. This time, we started from Snook Bight Marina on Fort Myers Beach and hopped aboard a sturdy vessel as the guests of Good Time Charters. We were fortunate to have Captain Mike, Captain Cristina and Captain Dwight all in our class, and found them to be excellent and knowledgeable guides for our “three hour tour… a three hour tour….” We had a beautiful sunshiny day for this adventure and the wildlife did not disappoint. There was some speculation that Captain Mike paid them all to show up ;) Well, if that’s true then it only serves to prove what clever wildlife tour guides those people at Good Time Charters really are!

Estero Bay Aquatic Preserve is the first aquatic preserve designated in the state of Florida (1966). The bay is extremely productive and contains elements of historic (and even pre-historic) significance, some of them submerged. A wide diversity of marine life starts out in the grass beds “nursery”. The environment is also ideal for rookeries, colonies of nesting birds who breed and raise their young on the many islands that dot the bay. Here are a few of the critters we managed to encounter on this adventure.

IMG_5666-Estero-Bay-least-terns

LEAST TERNS

Least terns are picky about who hangs around their nests. If you walk through their nesting area, they will dive-bomb your head. We would witness this phenomenon later in the trip near Big Carlos Pass.

 

IMG_5667-Estero-Bay-bottlenose-dolphin

BOTTLENOSE DOLPHIN

Hard to catch these guys in action; you see them, get the camera on the spot where they WERE and they have already submerged, only to resurface somewhere your focus ISN’T. One of my many field guide books calls them “toothed whales” – as opposed to baleen whales, who have food filters instead of teeth.

 

IMG_5671-Estero-Bay-plover-maybe

WILSON’S PLOVER (maybe…)

I think this might be a Wilson’s Plover but I can’t be sure because I cannot really see what color the legs are; if they are tan, then it is probably Wilson’s. They like to eat fiddler crabs.

 

IMG_5674-Estero-Bay-cormorant

DOUBLE-BREASTED CORMORANT

The way to tell a cormorant from an anhinga is to examine the beak. Does it look like it’s good for spearing, or for tearing? This guy, looking very statuesque, has a hooked beak, so it’s good for tearing – and that means he is a cormorant.

 

IMG_5681-Estero-Bay-brown-Pelican

BROWN PELICAN and SLOW DOWN!

A brown pelican in breeding plumage (note the chestnut brown on the neck) stands sentry over the low wake zone. I read in the news this week that there’s a certain budding political party objecting to low wake zones, claiming that they elevate wildlife over people. I can only roll my eyes at such arrogant, self-centered ignorance. :roll:

 

IMG_5682-Estero-Bay-osprey-nest

OSPREY NEST, IMPROVISED

Adaptive behavior – in the absence of tall trees, osprey will commonly build their nests on man-made structures such as light poles, tall buildings and yes, channel markers like this one. Saw lots of this type of adaptation in Rookery Bay too.

 

IMG_5689-Estero-Bay-sand-bar

BIRDING and RESPECTING THEIR SPACE

While observing wildlife, always remember to maintain a respectful distance. You don’t want to get close enough to interrupt their natural behaviors. Another good reason to keep your distance – if you’re in a boat, you risk running aground! We were advised that if you fall overboard in Estero Bay, the first thing you should do to save yourself is… stand up! It’s only a couple-three feet deep out there, which is part of what makes it a great breeding ground. Those are brown pelicans on the far sandbar, an osprey flapping around taking a bath in the middle, and an egret (can’t tell which – from the “fuzzy” head, I’ll guess snowy egret) hanging out in the foreground. I see another egret behind the prop roots, too – looks taller, my vote is great egret.

 

IMG_5694-Estero-Bay-Little-Blue-Heron

LITTLE BLUE HERON

The class on the boat spent a bit of time trying to identify this bird from afar. Sometimes the colors can be deceptive in light reflected off the water. In the end, we determined via binoculars, zoom lenses and getting a bit closer that he was indeed a little blue heron.

 

IMG_5696-Estero-Bay-brown-pelican-flock

FLOCK O’ PELICANS

Here’s a closer look at the flock of brown pelicans at rest on a sand bar.

 

IMG_5705-Estero-Bay-Big-Carlos-Pass

BIG CARLOS PASS and THE PARADE OF CLOUDS

We’re out of the no wake zone now and speeding toward the bridge that spans Big Carlos Pass. I fell in love with that line of cloud formations. They look like they are marching over the bridge toward Bonita ;)

 


Just under a minute of some cruising on the bay – feel the wind in your hair! :)

NEXT TIME: More cruising, more critters and a surprise musical performance!

 


 

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  6 comments for “Field Trip on Estero Bay, Part 1

  1. July 17, 2011 at 7:13 pm

    Oh that class looks like so much fun. There is a really good shelling spot close to there. Let me know if you are interested and I’ll give you directions.

    Take good care,

    Karen

    Erin *~*~* Reply:

    Karen, I would LOVE to have the directions. As we rounded the corner to go under the bridge at the Big Carlos, I saw some shells on a little beach and wanted to jump out of the boat LOL. You can hit me up at BellTinkR at gmail dot com – and thanks!

    *~*~*

  2. July 17, 2011 at 8:26 pm

    The class looks like a blast….one more thing I want to do when I move down there! Thanks for the tour!!

    Erin *~*~* Reply:

    I am already signed up for the Freshwater Systems class in the fall. Get to do some kayaking on rivers and such – so much fun ahead, w00t!

    *~*~*

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